Anjenita Khadoo
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Anjenita is studying Level 2 Art and Design.

Bryn Lechat - Nature’s Memories
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Photographs, Leaf Prints, Chicken’s Foot Prints, Sellotape Transfers, Poetry

The theme of nature taking over is very interesting as for me, it is more about the beginning or a notion of a take over, the foresight to see how nature could bloom and escape into an environment - algae in a pond, a rose bud growing up a wall, moss appearing in a farmhouse. During lockdown, I took advantage when the rules allowed us to go to public spaces again, and I took a trip to Elford Hall. Whilst there I discovered the Walled Garden, a beautiful, magical space, it bloomed with that element of nature on the brink. Although well-maintained, the garden exposed beautiful hints of nature’s intent.

My work here shows photographs from the Walled Garden, which have been layered using the method of sellotape transfers, with leaf prints and even prints I took from my chicken’s feet. The images show the story of my imagination; nature (via the leaf prints) slowly taking up it’s intent and consuming what is already there. Underneath the images, are poems which express the unity and conflict between the natural world and mankind

Chris Clark - Nature’s Marks
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For my work here I wanted to work with nature as the maker of marks - rather than use a traditional man made mark making object such as a pen, pencil or paintbrush. I used nature itself to create these marks, using a tree branch to ‘paint’ with, and stones to ‘print’ and ‘draw’ with. The marks came naturally, I had no prescribed image, figure or mark that I wanted to make, instead I allowed the natural objects to guide me. I have used blue, as it is one of the primary colours, and naturally associated with water - which was used within the paint to allow it to flow more easily.

Chris Titley - Shapes and Shadows
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I have spent many hours in my garden since lockdown. Over this time I noticed my garden, its shapes, lines, tones, and became interested in the contrasting patterns and textures the man made constructions made against the natural plant life that was consuming these structural elements. My piece is my attempt at communicating the juxtaposing shapes and textures evident in my space. The manmade and the natural, harmoniously balancing each other’s visual and structural elements. The natural elements relying on the structures to grow and spread, with the man made structures acting as a support.

Daisy Jones - The anatomy behind these copper veins
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For this piece, I wanted to focus on the feeling of being taken over, ravaged by surroundings, and the aftermath of feeling overwhelmed and exhausted. I thought about colours, how I could translate these difficult emotions into different hues and convey them in a digital painting, I chose tones with depth and richness to match the intensity of these feelings. I also portrayed the building as a figure to explore what the structure must feel, after it’s history of being taken over by its surrounding nature. This building's past must be disorderly and tangled, therefore I left my preliminary sketches sat atop the layers of shadows and highlights, to take pride in the process.

Danielle Mortlock - Birdsong
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Embroidered Denim Jacket

“Birdsong brings relief,
To my longing.
I’m just as ecstatic as they are,
But with nothing to say!
Please, universal soul, practice
Some song or something through me!”
Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi

‘Don’t you think the birds have got louder’ is a question I’ve heard repeated many times during lockdown, and indeed a question that I have asked myself. Have the birds gotten louder? Or is man so still and quiet that we can hear the birds more clearly?

Birdsong has been one of the joys of lockdown, a little bit of relief and happiness when we are scratching around for those joyous moments to just feel something other than worried or scared. I have indeed enjoyed the peaceful moments sitting in my garden, listening to the birds singing their glorious tunes. They make time stop, for just a little while, giving me something pure to focus on and tune into.

The jacket that I have created here celebrates birds and the respite that they have brought through lockdown. I have used an old denim jacket - a conscious choice in order to reduce waste textile pollution - and have embroidered the scene of a bird singing. I have included feathers into the embroidery to give it texture.

Daniel Simcox - Growing Light
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Moving, changing and intertwining. Trees, leaves and foliage, by their own nature, are chaotic. The weaving of these objects is central to this piece and is composed through a three act structure which creates a platform for the familiar to be viewed and experienced.

The images were created in a camera obscura, one of the oldest photographic techniques, collated into a silent film. A camera creates a frozen moment, on which one can usually linger. However, in contrast, stop frame animation is used, which gives little time to contemplate and admire the objects as the frames unfold.

costumed character under a blossom tree with as wing

Ellie Akers - CherryB
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Ellie is studying Level 3 TV, Film and Media Extended Diploma.

Human head made of plant life

Emelia Louise Cox
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Nature's contribution to mental health!

Over lockdown the only time you were allowed to venture outside was for physical exercise once a day. Due to this Nature became more visible and it inspired me to create the above piece of art using natural materials.

Nature can be very therapeutic and can help take your mind to a happy place for a while which was really important for me and many other during theses time
I tried to keep to a similar color scheme of pastel and vibrant colour/material to give light and happiness.

Erica Ford
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For this type of work I wanted to use photography to capture the use of wildlife to show how they play a role in nature. In each photo I aimed to capture a main focus but always to have something relating to nature in the background, or if possible to show how this can easily become unmanaged/ overgrown.

When taking these photos I went out at different times during the day, some managing to capture nature taking over, whether that be at the side of a path or nature getting in the way of the moon to the left.These photos i was happy they met the criteria. Although the other photos I took, I felt they met the criteria in a different way, capturing the other side of nature by showing what lives there and how they also take over as well.

Ginnie May Turner
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Painting of an Easter Cactus on a Wooden Stool

Acrylic on Paper

Hayley Brooks - Cellulose
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Ivy leaves made from stitched plastic packaging and placed in a natural environment

Revelations over the destruction of nature caused by plastics and waste textiles within the environment have been the primary root of much of my recent work. As a nature enthusiast, I’ve enjoyed this period of grace that the lockdown has provided the natural environment - hearing more birdsong, witnessing plants flourishing, and noticing fewer waste, plastics and litter scattered around. I had also begun to notice more ivy, and how it seems to attach on to anything; bridges, walls, iron gates, wooden fences, winding around lamp posts even. Ivy is a plant known for its strength and ferocity, being able to grow and even thrive in some of the hardest environments.

The work here uses plastic packaging, which has been repurposed and stitched into a series of colourful ivy leaves. The use of the plastic allows me to be eco-conscious and recycle, but also play upon how the first synthetic plastics were derived from cellulose, a substance found in plants and trees. Cellulose is the main substance that makes up the cell walls and fibers of plants. The plastic leaves were then placed back in amongst the natural ivy, giving the sense of nature enveloping the man made, taking back, and reuniting the cellulose in the plastic leaves back to their ‘roots’. The filmed version of this, allows for the environment to be heard, focusing on the background noise of the various bird calls, which seem so much louder than the contrasting ‘man made’ noise also heard from the main road.

As in the cycle of nature and life, the plastic leaves were removed from amongst the natural ivy and will be repurposed once again into something new.

Hayley Brooks - Aqua, Terra, Aer, Ignis
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Garment made from organic cotton, treated with rust and hapa-zome.

Nature and its various forces have long been an interest of mine, they seem almost magical, having roots and connections in many faiths, practices and ancient mythologies. This period of lockdown has allowed us the time to sit and take notice, to witness these great forces of nature at work; the immense rainfall and clearer waterways, the Earth positively blooming with plants and flowers, the Winds that scatter around the leaves and the Fire’s that have spread across the local countryside. The forces of nature can be seen through other, less obvious sources too; the rust that forms on metals left outside, exposed to that beautiful union of air and water. The spider’s cobweb that gently blows in the breeze. The scorch left on the leaves by the sun on a hot summer’s day.

During one of my permitted lockdown walks, I happened upon a metal box, encasing electricals, that was attached to the side of a building. It had been left, abandoned, like many buildings at the beginning of lockdown. The forces of nature were clear and present in this one metal box; it had rusted, spider’s had created their homes, plants grew up it and had begun to envelop it. This alien, unnatural, man made item, was being reclaimed. It was this sight that inspired the garment seen here.

I have used organic cotton as the base of the garment, creating it in layers that explore the four elements. Rusted metal objects have been used to expose on to the wet fabric, left to dry they imprinted themselves on to the fabric, allowing that bond of water and air to be visible (air/aer and water/aqua). I have used botanicals from the Earth to print on to one side of the garment, using the traditional Japanese technique of hapa-zome to pound the natural pigments from the botanicals and transfer them to the fabric (earth/terra). Heat was also used to add texture and colour (fire/ignis).

This piece also has deeper roots in commenting upon the destruction of Earth through the pollution from textile waste and the pollution of our waterways through the use of synthetic dyes. To be eco-conscious in my work, I used an old bedsheet (organic cotton) and the dyeing/printing processes relied on natural sources.

Jessica Allen - Nature’s Sanctum
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Embroidery on fabric.

‘To primitive man the whisper and movement of leaves and the silent unfolding of flowers were proofs of life and power, and their regeneration was a promise of nature’s continuity.’
Margaret Baker

During lockdown my garden became a welcome refuge in the absence of contact with the outside world; my own personal sanctum. Tending to the plant life in my garden has allowed me to hone my awareness of the natural world, observing the strength and grace of nature in all its forms. Spending my days at home has given me the rare opportunity to see the full journey from tiny shoots to blooming flowers and ripened fruits and vegetables. I have taken great solace in nature’s ability to flourish unconcerned and unaffected by the troubles of man.

Willow woven skirt

Jasmin Sund - Totem of Willow
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Woven soaked willow branches

Willow trees are noted for their flexibility and graceful appearance, hence the adjective willowy, which means "gracefully slender and lithe”, qualities seen as desirable feminine attributes. This is, in turn, why I chose to attempt a woven willow A- line skirt. The branches can be bent to a shape you want after soaking for an amount of time as well as creating resemblance of natural growth. The skirt can be seen here, placed back in amongst it’s natural environment, an ethereal symbol of the divine feminine amongst nature’s landscape.

I find that my eye is drawn to Willow trees when it comes to natural beauty. They look so overgrown, and yet however, dainty. This is the same as my grandmother; she also has a willow tree in her garden, every year we visit her there. Like this willow tree I humbly picture my family, wholesome, independent and unifying, although we are all now separated. We place the table to the right of the Willow tree for lunch, Mommo, my grandmother is wearing an A-line skirt that inspired this one. Maybe I’m not there now but I will be again soon. My willow skirt is the overgrown childhood family totem reminding me that we’ll be back together soon.

Joy Thorney Croft
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Joy is studying Level 3/4 Foundation Diploma Art and Design

Hat with flowers

Jade Webley - Petasum Naturae
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This is ‘Nature Hat’, inspired by how the natural world has been flourishing during this time of lockdown, in complete contrast to humankind, who have been perishing at the hands of the Covid-19 disease. The hat is a man-made item, and thus represents humankind. It sits underneath the flowers - nature, which stand out bright and colourful, having woven their stems into the base of the hat, firmly planting themselves in this urban world. The ‘Nature Hat’ stands as a metaphor for this changing landscape, where nature will now be at the forefront of man’s existence on this planet.

vegetation forms a human face

Lorna Medley - Sound of silence
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My journey for this project was about going back to basics and stripping myself of all technology. Enjoying the simple pleasure of painting in the silence that the lock down during the pandemic has brought us. Researching the orangery and how it was left for someone to come in with a vision of what the building could become and seeing it through was a poignant feeling that interested me to try and capture. Inspired by works by Dale Chihuly and the huge floral scenes created in the Bellagio Las Vegas hotel I visited a few years ago. This helped me to consider how we co-exist with our flora and fauna. The silence of no human interaction, deserted, but for the wildlife, birds, insects and the rustle of leaves must have been a beautiful thing to behold. Whilst sitting quiet in my garden and just listening and watching the plants move, I wondered if I sat long enough, could I become part of the scene? would the plants take over me? Metamorphosis, taking me back into nature and appreciating the power of the natural world.

bodice with leaf pattern

Marlena Ebertowska - Folium
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Co-ordinating Bodice and Skirt, Leaf Prints on Fabric with Embroidery

The lockdown for me has been hectic and a time of ups and downs. I’ve continued to work throughout, unintentionally turned in to a teacher to homeschool my children, and tried to continue my own college studies. This has been a great juggling act which has been trying at times, but also very rewarding.

During the stressful times, I have taken solace in nature and being outdoors. I’ve been appreciating the beautiful weather that we have been having, noticing how contrasted the colours of nature are; when the leaves of a tree pop against the backdrop of a bright blue sky. I’ve come to enjoy the trees more, the shelter they provide for us from the blazing sun, a canopy when it rains, a beautiful image and gentle reminder of our humanity when they rustle in the wind.

The garment I have made here is an ode to the leaf (Folium). I wanted to keep a strong contrast in my work, hence the bold green against the striking white. I used paints to print the leaf shape and pattern onto the fabric and then stitched around the leaves to highlight their shapes, make them pop and to ‘illustrate’ them with my thread.

Millie Jamieson - My Room With A View
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The lockdown period for me has been a time of great solitude; feeling safe at home and rediscovering my own space that almost seemed forgotten. During quarantine I've spent a great deal of time in my bedroom, particularly looking out of my window at the world beyond the safety of my four walls. We've been in lockdown for a long while now, longing for what’s on the outside that we once knew, but all knowing that staying inside our homes is the safest place for us.

Working with the brief of how nature has taken over, I’ve used the view of my room, a view I’ve come to know so well and feel the safety of. Nature is indeed taking over, not only positively through the bloom of plants and flowers, but negatively through the virus, a twisted process latching on to human-nature. My Room With A View is now lush with flowers, longing for that natural world to enter into my own. On the windowsill lies bottles of hand sanitizer, a change in the usual view that Coronavirus has brought along; noting that 3 are empty, highlighting how many months we've been practicing this way of life. Emphasizing that it is my room I embroidered a Nirvana poster to the right of the picture. And finally the newspaper article behind the window, telling us what we're keeping safe and indoors from.

Michelle Maycock - Within
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Mixed media on canvas panel.

I wanted to nature at the heart of this project and so I began by using the sun to expose wild plants and flowers onto photographic paper. I then photographed the developed images within natural settings.

I decided to concentrate on ivy for its truly resilient character. Lockdown has been trying at times but we have made it through and I hope we will come out stronger for it.

The final piece features original sun painting images using ivy vines, a photographic print as well as illustration. I used multiple processes to complete the final piece, which are layered to depict the cycle of natural growth and represent the orangery’s multiple takeovers by nature.

Melanie Plant - Nature Taking Over
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Acrylic ink & Acrylic paint.

During the Covid 19 lock down I have spent many hours shielding in isolation in my garden. Even though we have been on lock down nature has still carried on in its own way. There has been less pollution in the air which has had a positive effect on the growth of plant life and insects. I love my garden and I love to nurture my plants and observe the wildlife and insects that come in my garden.

I decided to engage using nature to create a piece of art for the Orangery. Over the years the Orangery has been renovated and used by people who have taken care of it and nurtured the exotic plants and their surroundings. On numerous occasions over the years the Orangery fell out of use and back into disrepair. Each time this happened nature took back over the Orangery and the place that was nurtured by humans started to be taken back over by nature and wildlife. The Orangery even had a fox living inside for a while.

My thoughts went back to my garden and what would happen if it was left to nature and I stopped nurturing my plants, If there was no longer any human contact what would happen, would it become like the Orangery and slowly become consumed and taken over? During the weeks I have taken photographs of my favourite plants and neighbouring gardens, some have been left unattended and nature has crept in the form of rampant brambles and vines. I have always considered nature to be beautiful but observing over the weeks shows that the nurtured plants would not survive in the same way. Nature also has its dark side which can suffocate and take over and throw things into disrepair. An example of this is the Orangery.

In my artwork for the Orangery I wanted to be able to show this in a nurtured and non nurtured way. I created the background to my work to show light and dark, the light areas were too depict the nurtured areas and the darker areas to depict the darker side creeping back in. The flowers and brambles were also used to show how the nurtured can fall into disrepair.

a dress which tells the story of Ingestre Hall

Madison Stone - Once Upon a Time at Ingestre Hall
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Embroidery, Satin, Organza, Bark, Astroturf, Ivy

The story of Ingestre Hall, notably the Orangery, is that of great love, abandonment, takeover and re-discovery. It is such a grand fairytale - an opening narrative of positivity, a period of turbulence and bleak warnings, with the happy ending of love, passion, enjoyment and lessons learned.

To celebrate it’s history, I have created a dress which tells the story of Ingestre Hall - the beginning of the story, when it was home to the Chetwynd family; the bodice of the dress shows you looking through mature trees represented by the bark, which frame the embroidered Orangery and gardens of Ingestre Hall. The skirt flips this, showing the wild and overgrown starting to make its way to the building that was eventually abandoned because of a fire and left for the ivy to take over, showing it starting to weave and tangle around and eventually take over.

Molly Turford - Hapa-Zome
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Hapa-zome means ‘leaf print’ and is a traditional Japanese technique used to transfer the natural colour pigments and shape from botanicals. Hapa-zome is created by placing flowers and leaves between sheets of paper or fabric and gently hammering, allowing the colour to seep and print. The results are always unique, never uniform and are ever changing, even with the same plant. I used this technique to comment upon the wonders that the natural world can provide us with; one-off prints directly from the Earth. I love how some of the prints change so much from the flower that created them - different shapes and even colours, and some even look like Rorschach blots, leading us to see other things within them. The natural environment has indeed taken centre stage here, and almost teases humankind to look deep within it, what is the truth? What is nature challenging us to do?

Nicole Hempsall - Nature’s Respite
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Newspaper Article, Flowers, Embroidery on Denim Jacket

It’s been a strange and changing time of late - worrying, uncertain, anxious, heartbreaking, and yet in a way, uplifting. The pandemic has meant that as a nation, and indeed a planet, we have faced unprecedented times and are facing an uncertain future. However, through the devastation that Covid-19 has wreaked, we have come together like I’ve never seen before and learned some lessons along the way. People have united in a common worldwide goal, almost encouraged by the natural world, which has blossomed and seems to have exploded as we begin to fight this battle. Nature has been given an opportunity to thrive through this adversity, being left to its own devices, it has taken over and positive signs are developing. We must now follow this path, and walk alongside nature to bloom ourselves, and push, and fight, and thrive through this pandemic.

To express this, I have created an up-cycled denim jacket. The use of upcycling comments upon the environmental problems that the Earth has faced from waste textiles, noting that upcycling has become a popular pastime for many creative people during lockdown and a more eco-conscious awareness has sprouted. On the back of the jacket I have featured the overwhelming positive message that stands out from the pandemic. There is a newspaper article in the background, stitched on to the jacket, that documents the story so far of Covid-19. Over this, and taking over, I have embroidered a female face and have crowned this with flowers. The face embodies Mother Nature, giving us support, love, beauty and peace. I wanted to show that nature is encouraging, and also that it has become a positive mindset, especially for myself, as it has been a great solace for many people to be able to sit in their gardens, talk walks and witness this beautiful flourish, a front row seat to the show of Mother Nature.

Nicole Ward
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During this quarantine, There have been a lot of impacts to everyone all around the world, Our lives have been greatly affected by the rapid spread of this virus.

I myself, have witnessed a number of changes to my neighbourhood as well as myself and my loved ones.

About the Piece
Firstly, I created it digitally, due to the fact of the internet playing a huge role during this quarantine, thanks to the internet, we have all managed to stay connected, even if we were far apart.

The piece is supposed to show nature has engulfed the buildings, The overgrown and uncared for plants, goes well with the emptiness of the streets,

The Colours are a mix of blue and green, Blue is to represent sadness and solidarity, whilst the green is supposed to represent growth.

I believe even though this is a saddening time, full of solitude it is also full of growth, It's a new experience for most of us,
we can grow as people from this whole experience and mature, to engulf our old ways and make the new.

For an example of this growth, for the first time in a long time, in the UK more attention is being brought to the healthcare workers, who were once neglected by the government. Improving our healthcare system, will most likely improve us, if the next Covid-19 comes around the corner.

Rebecca Hobbs - A world of nature
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Mixed media- watercolour, coloured pencil, acrylic

My project piece is based on the impact of nature due to the pandemic and is a symbolisation of my surroundings. Within my piece I decided to focus on the wild flowers I see daily on walks with my dog. I wanted to depict how during lock down they have become an overgrown familiar surrounding in my everyday life which seem to dominate the nature around me.

Throughout lock down I have stayed close to home and so my piece represents how my world has become entangled with beautiful wild flowers and overgrown plants. The intertwined vines suggest our planet as enclosed with overgrown thriving nature during this time within the pandemic. Much like an orangery, our world is being taken over by nature.

Roberta Whitaker - Ingestre Orangery
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150x80cm Oil and Mixed Media on Canvas

My work took inspiration from how nature has overtaken the orangery in the past and pays homage to its found state. I noted the fig tree that was said to be growing through the centre of the building and out through the roof. I have included glass around the central fig tree to show natures power over natural materials and the emergence of the fig tree out of the building. The other vegetation elements have been created from images on your website of the restoration process. The building is painted in a dream like way with minimal detail to represent the memory of how the building was originally found and how this has now been combined to the past. I have used mixed media in the piece to represent the contrast between hard man made materials and softer natural materials.

A fairy costume design

Tamara Suhapalova - Ava, The Nature Fairy
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This is a costume design inspired by nature and the magic that it holds. The costume is for a made-up character, Ava, who is a nature fairy that looks after the natural world, from plants and trees, to all animals in the kingdom. She comforts all types of creatures, no matter their size or where they’re from. Ava cares for the trees, plants and flowers too by helping them grow and nurturing them - replanting seeds, watering and healing any vandalism that the humans may have caused to her beloved nature. The costume is made from textiles and nature itself - using chippings of bark on the bodice and grasses to form part of the skirt and cuffs. Real flowers would be used in the headdress, secured by more man-made items to blend the two worlds.

a concrete bunker-like building in the woods

William Jones-Cuncliffe
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Will is studying Level 2 Art and Design.